Nikita Khrushchev

Khrushchev, Lenin & Stalin tied together on one document!

Khrushchev, Lenin & Stalin tied together on one document!



Typed Letter Signed, "N. Khrushchev," in green ink as First Secretary of the Communist Party of Ukraine, 2 pages, 8" x 11.5", [Kiev, September 29, 1948 in Russian and hand addressed in his holograph to Georgy Malenkov concerning the need for more paper in order to meet the needs of Ukraine's printing needs. Additionally dated in Khrushchev's hand. File holes and minor losses not affecting text along left margin, contemporary ink stamps and notations, some light creases, else very good. 



Originally to be sent to Vyacheslav Molotov, Khrushchev crossed out his name and added Malenkov's name instead. Khruschchev's letter to Maleknov reads in full (translated): "In 1948, Ukrainian book publishing houses must release 1,661 book titles, with a total printing of 36.6 million copies. The book product publishing plans were prepared on the basis of a printing paper stock allocation for the republic in the amount of 4,400 tons and the maximum use of insignificant carryovers from 1947. But the fulfillment of this plan is threatened with failure. According to a resolution of the USSR Council of Ministers dated 04/04/1948, 530 tons of paper that we obtained in 1947 from the 1946 stock has been withheld and transferred to the Union Government reserve. In addition, the receipt of paper toward stock is taking place erratically, with long interruptions. On September 20th of the current year, Ukraine had only received 2,680 tons, or 60% of the annual plan. We have been forced to use the paper received, primarily to publish classical works of Marxism-Leninism, as well as textbooks for schools, junior colleges, and institutions of higher learning, thereby depriving other publishing houses of the ability to release artistic and technical literature.


In order to ensure the fulfillment of the plan for book product publications in 1948, eliminate interruptions and standstills in the operation of printing houses, and create the necessary prerequisites for normal publishing house operation in early 1949, the Central Committee of the CP(b)U hereby requests: 1. That the transfer of 530 tons of paper to the Union Government reserve that the Ukrainian SSR received in 1947, which was shipped and purchased for its 1946 stock, be cancelled. 2. That instructions be issued to the USSR Gosplan to ship 1,200 tons of printing paper to the Ukrainian SSR early in the 4th quarter of this year in addition to the 1948 stock, including: a/ 400 tons – to ensure the publication of three volumes of The Writings of V. I. Lenin and one volume of The Writings of I. V. Stalin, as well as a number of high-priority works for the 2nd Congress of Ukrainian Writers, which have been prepared in addition to the 1948 plan, and; b/ 800 tons – to create the minimum necessary paper carryover in publishing houses for 1949. 3. That the USSR Minister of the Timber and Paper Industries be required to ship the 931 tons of printing paper that the Ukraine is owed for its 1948 stock during September-October of 1948." 


Khrushchev likely crossed out Molotov's name to Malenkov's due to a mistake on the part of the typist. Molotov, as foreign minister, would not have been the appropriate person to deal with this sort of request. Molotov is best known today for a homemade bomb named in his honor: the "Molotov Cocktail." The name was coined by the Finns following the notorious Molotov-Ribbentrop pact of 1939, signed on the eve of the German invasion of Poland. The pact set up spheres of influence between Nazi Germany and Soviet Russia. Part of the Soviet sphere was Finland, which Stalin invaded in November 1939. The Finns dubbed Soviet cluster bombs as "Molotov Bread Baskets" (alluding to Stalin's lie that the areal bombing raids were actually emergency food deliveries). Outgunned and outmanned, the Finns developed a novel way to stop Soviet tanks by filling a glass bottle with gasoline and a fabric wick that when lit and thrown, would explode in a fireball on impact. The Finns dubbed the homemade device a "Molotov Cocktail" in honor of the Soviet foreign minister.



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Item: 58575

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Nikita KhrushchevNikita KhrushchevNikita KhrushchevNikita Khrushchev
Nikita Khrushchev
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