John Hancock

Scarce Printing! Speeches of John Hancock alluding to the Declaration of Independence and the new U.S. Constitution and announcing that Congress has passed an act lending the States money to pay the debts they incurred during the Revolutionary War

John Hancock served as Governor of Massachusetts from October 25, 1780 to February 17, 1785, when he resigned due to illness. Again elected to consecutive one-year terms, he served from May 30, 1787 until his death on October 8, 1793, when he was succeeded as Governor by Lieutenant Governor Samuel Adams.

“Resolves of the General Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts,” pages 3-30 (Evans 22657), with continuous pagination through p. 35 (Evans 22658), 35p, 8” x 12.5”. Boston: [Printed by Thomas Adams, printer to the Honourable General Court, 1790]. Two separate bindings. Fine condition.

Comprises:

(1) “Resolves of the General Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts: Together with Messages, &c. of his Excellency the Governour of the said Court: Begun and held at Boston, in the county of Suffolk, on Wednesday the Twenty-sixth day of May, Anno Domini, 1790. His Excellency JOHN HANCOCK, Esq. Governour His Honour SAMUEL ADAMS Esq. Lieutenant Governor.” Numbered pp 3-30. Evans 22657

After listing the members of the Massachusetts Senate and House of Representatives, “Friday, May 28. Art Twelve o’clock, the two Houses met in Convention in the Representatives’ Chamber…” Governor John Hancock then addressed the Convention in a short message, acknowledging his reelection, concluding, he “shall zealously endeavor, in all my conduct, to justify the partiality which has been frequently exhibited by my fellow citizens towards me.”

Samuel Adams then addressed the Convention, acknowledging his reelection (“repeated call”), concluding, ”May the administration of the Federal Government, and those of the several States of the Union, be guided by the unerring finger of Heaven! – Each of them, and all of them united, will then, if the people are wise, be as prosperous as the wisdom of human institutions and the circumstances of human society will admit.”

On June 1, 1790, Governor Hancock again addressed both Houses (pages 7-9), by first alluding to the Declaration of Independence just 14 years earlier and the U.S. Constitution which Massachusetts had ratified in 1788. In part, “At a time, when the attention of this country was necessarily called to a defence against an invading enemy, the people of the several States originated, or revised, systems of governments: On these systems, the freedom and happiness of their posterity will essentially depend. The great plan for uniting the powers, and directing the force of so many independent States, rising into one confederated and powerful Republic, could not in such a situation be properly attended to. To united in one great system of National Government, so many separate Republicks, including extremes of climate, and possessed by people very carious in their habits of life, in their manners, and in their religious opinions, was indeed a work which demanded the utmost exertion a of human wisdom and required the most unembarrassed deliberations. This seems to have been reserved as an honourary task for the people of America. Whether all our expectations will be eventually answered from this plan, must be left to future experience…”

(2) “Resolves of the General Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts: Together with Messages, &c. of his Excellency the Governour of the said Court: Begun and held at Boston, in the county of Suffolk, on Wednesday the Twenty-sixth day of May, Anno Domini, 1790; and from thence continued by Prorogation and Adjournment to Wednesday the fifteenth of September following.” Numbered pp 31-35. Evans 22658

On September 15, 1790, Governor Hancock addressed both Houses in the Senate Chamber, notifying the members that “On the fourth of August last, an act was made and established, by the Congress of the United States – by which, twenty-one million five hundred thousand dollars, of the debts of the respective States, incurred for compensations, expenditures, for services, or supplies, towards the prosecution of the late war, or for the defence of the United States, or some part thereof, during the same, is permitted to be loaned on the credit of the United States…” Governor Hancock the Treasurer of Massachusetts determined the consolidated debt of the State to be $5,276,954 and 5/6 of a dollar. He then directs the members to “do the most speedy justice to our creditors…”


Item: 57453

Price: $2,800.00
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John Hancock
John Hancock
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