Title Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow
Number 34211
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Category Miscellaneous
Price $32,000.00
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Unique and phenomenal Bonnie and Clyde crime collection, which includes four bullets and a group of 27 first generation photographs. Accompanied by the unique provenance of having been featured on the popular PBS television series, "History Detectives".
Description
The amazing provenance of the Bonnie and Clyde bullets and crime scene and autopsy photos is detailed here in a sequential synopsis of the facts of research undertaken by the show's panel, as well as their subsequent conclusions. In late 2002 the show's producers were contacted by a woman named Cassandra Goss, who claimed to be in the possession of five bullets which she believed were taken from the bodies of Bonnie & Clyde. She stated that the bullets had been in her family for two generations and originated from her great grandfather-in-law, J. D. Goss. Lending credibility to her story was the fact that the bullets were accompanied by 27 first generation photographs relating to Bonnie and Clyde, including a number of graphic images picturing the couple's bullet riddled bodies just after their deaths.

Furthermore, seven of the photographs featured official forensic stampings bearing the name "Geo. J. Lacy - Scientific Crime Detective Laboratory - Houston, Texas". Other than the family's long-standing oral reminiscences of their origin, she claimed to have no other knowledge of the bullets, thus, she contacted the show in the hope that they could conclusively authenticate them as having come from the bodies of Bonnie and Clyde. Armed with this information, the team went to work. The investigation proceeded on two fronts. The first was the physical characteristics of the bullets: did the caliber of bullets match up to the weapons used to kill Bonnie and Clyde? The other line of investigation involved J. D. Goss: Who was he and would he have had access to the corpses immediately after the shootout? An analysis of the bullets showed that three of them were .38 caliber and the other two, .45 caliber. None of the weapons known to have been used by law enforcement officials during the ambush fired .38 caliber bullets, thus eliminating those from consideration. There was one gun, however, used by one of the officers that day that could have fired the remaining two bullets. Having established that fact, they focused their attention toward Goss. A preliminary investigation showed that he was not a member of the law enforcement group that took part in the ambush, nor was he listed on any of the coroner's records as having been present during the autopsy. So who was he? Further research turned up an interesting fact and led to a completely different line of investigation. Goss was a Dallas ballistics expert who was called in to assist George Lacy (the same George Lacy whose name was printed on seven of the photos) in an analysis of test bullets fired from the guns found in Bonnie and Clyde's car after their deaths. That information was crucial to another case taking place in Fort Worth regarding the killing of two State Highway patrolmen on April 1, 1934, approximately seven weeks prior to the death of Bonnie and Clyde. Ironically the chief suspect in those killings was Bonnie's sister, Billie Mace. Goss was brought in to establish whether or not those test bullets fired from the guns in Bonnie and Clyde's car matched up with bullets found at the scene of the crime. Five .45 shell casings were found at the April 1st crime scene, and Bonnie and Clyde's car was found to have seven Colt .45's among their vast arsenal. On May 31st George Lacy announced that the test bullets matched the bullets found at the crime scene and Billie Mace was released. Based upon all these facts, it was the conclusion of the show's panel that although the bullets in Cassandra Goss' possession were not taken from the bodies of Bonnie and Clyde, the evidence strongly suggested that the two .45 caliber bullets were from the group of test bullets fired from Bonnie and Clyde's guns - bullets that eventually exonerated Bonnie's sister, Billie Mace. Included in this lot are one of those .45 caliber bullets, and three .38 caliber bullets (these bullets have solid and credible oral history associating them to Bonnie and Clyde as shown on the TV show). Also included are all 27 of the first generation photographs that originally accompanied the bullets. Aside from having one of the actual guns used by Bonnie and Clyde, this bullet, fired from one of the guns found in their car at the time of their death, represents perhaps the finest and most desirable collectible link imaginable relating to the legendary outlaw duo. It presents a tangible and direct connection to both larger-than-life figures who have dominated our cultural heritage for the past 70 years. Nearly equal in significance, but incredibly more dramatic to the bullet, are the photographs themselves. First generation photographs of Bonnie and Clyde are extremely rare, and even the host of "History Detectives" remarked that these were the first such photos he had seen in over 23 years. Ten of the images picture Bonnie and/or Clyde, including five graphic death shots, three of Bonnie and two of Clyde. The others include members of their gang as well as shots of their bulletridden car. A video tape of the "History Detectives" program, aired on August 7, 2003, that featured this collection, is included, as are numerous related papers provided by the show's producers, documenting their findings. Please note that the graphic and potentially disturbing photos are available only by calling our offices.
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